When poets lose their ideals

George Carlin said: “Inside every cynical person there is a disappointed idealist”.

Or, my version is: Every disappointed idealist will sooner or later become cynical.

Every idealist is a dreamer. I believe all poets, writers, storytellers, artists are dreamers. They, after all, dream up stories. And I believe that most of them, in the course of their lives, must have found out that this world is a tough place for dreamers. The world has all the powers to make even the fiercest dreamer bitter and rough.

The disillusionment, however, sometimes works as the best muse.

The greatest artists were always a bit tragic. They were often sad people, lonely people, disappointed critics of life. In fact, it seems their creativity thrives when they’re at their lowest.

Break a musician’s heart and be sure you’ll end up in a song. A beautiful song.
Make a painter angry and he’ll paint you a violent, enraged and aggressive piece of art full of raw emotions.
Disappoint a poet and get ready for one sincere, lyrical and gloomy poem. Or two. Or a collection of poems.

Art is something that cannot be in any way forced. It has to come naturally out of our emotions and when there are none, or they’re not strong enough, there is no art. And god only knows why, but negative emotions tend to be the strongest.

What would poets even write about if they were only happy and content all the time? Beautiful things do not need much embellishments. Poets’s life mission is to take an ugly thing, embellish it with words and make it pretty. It’s about transforming the sadness into art and turning it into something beautiful.

Sadness, as I discover, is inspiringly beautiful and beautifully inspiring.

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One thought on “When poets lose their ideals

  1. Pingback: Edvard Munch | Katka on the Shore

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